Constructing Disability Categories in Schooling

How does difference become pathologized and criminalized?
What are the experiences of students placed under different impairment categories by school systems (i.e., intellectual disability, speech and language impairment, emotional and behavioral disorder, autism, learning disability, etc.)? How do stereotypes and ideas about these impairments shape disabled students school experiences?
How do students other identities impact the way school systems categorize, label, treat, educate, place, and/or remove students?
Thinking about disability as a social construct, what are some of the ways this understanding can be applied to the special education system? How is the medical model of disability a part of the special education system and school/schooling more broadly?
You can consider the questions you have, things youve learned, and experiences or connections youd like to share about the social construction of disability categories in schooling.
Note: Cas Faulds identifies as non-binary and uses the pronouns they/them/theirs, so in your responses, please be respectful of their pronouns (example: In their essay, they write that). Your response should be at least 250 words and use APA Style in-text citations.
Here are all the materials that should be used for this assignment.

Week 2: Monday, June 7th to Sunday, June 13th
Topic: Constructing Disability Categories in Schooling

Read at least 2:
Casella, R. & Page, M. (2004). The institutional context of being a behavior problem. Disability Studies Quarterly, 24 (2): http://dsq-sds.org/article/view/488.
Faulds, C. (2015, July 23) Reclaiming the dignity lost in a diagnosis [blog post]. Retrieved from http://wearelikeyourchild.blogspot.com/2015/07/reclaiming-dignity-lost-in-diagnosis.html.
Reid & Valle. (2004). The discursive practice of learning disability: Implications for instruction and parent-school relations. Journal of Learning Disabilities, 37 (6).
Triano, S. L. (2000). Categorical eligibility for special education: The enshrinement of the medical model in disability policy. Disability Studies Quarterly, 20(4). https://dsq-sds.org/article/view/263/275
Zurcher-Long, E. (2016, February 9). Can speech challenged students get an appropriate education? [blog post]. Retrieved from https://emmashopebook.com/2016/02/09/can-speech-challenged-students-get-an-appropriate-education/
Watch Intelligent Lives (documentary):
Habib, D. (Director). (2018). Intelligent lives [motion picture]. United States: Passion River.
Assignments:
Reading response post and replies to two classmates by Sunday at 11:59 p.m.
Annamma, S. (2018). Introduction: Prison nation and the school-prison nexus. The pedagogy of pathologization; Dis/abled girls of color in the school-prison nexus. New York: Routledge.
Annamma, S. (2018). Chapter 1. The pedagogy of pathologization; Dis/abled girls of color in the school-prison nexus. New York: Routledge.
Casella, R. & Page, M. (2004). The institutional context of being a behavior problem. Disability Studies Quarterly, 24 (2): http://dsq-sds.org/article/view/488
Faulds, C. (2015, July 23) Reclaiming the dignity lost in a diagnosis [blog post]. Retrieved from http://wearelikeyourchild.blogspot.com/2015/07/reclaiming-dignity-lost-in-diagnosis.html
Reid & Valle. (2004). The discursive practice of learning disability: Implications for instruction and parent-school relations. Journal of Learning Disabilities, 37 (6).
Triano, S. L. (2000). Categorical eligibility for special education: The enshrinement of the medical model in disability policy. Disability Studies Quarterly, 20(4). https://dsq-sds.org/article/view/263/275
Zurcher-Long, E. (2016, February 9). Can speech challenged students get an appropriate education? [blog post]. Retrieved from https://emmashopebook.com/2016/02/09/can-speech-challenged-students-get-an-appropriate-education/