What are the three signs that an action or perspective is morally condemnable according to Appiah?

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1. Did you download the syllabus and enjoy the overview?
2. Have you ever taken a Philosophy course before? What kind?
Please give 1-2 Paragraphs for each question
The Ethical Life (TEL, 4
th
Ed)
1
1. What are the three signs that an action or perspective is morally condemnable according to
Appiah? (Starts on 225)
2. Please rank in order of importance for you the four morally condemnable contenders.
a.
Explain why you ranked them that way.
Hedonism by Mill
1. According to Mill, pleasure, and freedom from pain, are the only things desirable as ends. Is he
right is that how we all make decisions? Can you think of any counterexamples? (12)
2. After claiming that the Greatest-Happiness Principle determines whether actions are right or
wrong Mill asks us to contemplate whether there are deeper and longer lasting pleasures.
Why is this important for his kind of Hedonism? (11-13)
3. Why is it better to be Socrates dissatisfied than a pig satisfied? Expand on Mills argument
here (14).
4. Overall: Mill conflates Happiness and Pleasure are they the same things as is claimed by Mill?
The Experience Machine by Nozick
1. Nozick takes the opposite position as Mill. Explain his central thesis of we want to do certain
things as a counter to Mills Greater-Happiness Principle? (22).
2. Would you get into the machine? Why or why not?
1
In week one some of you are still waiting on books. Here is the original essay by Appiah from the Washington
Post:
https://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/09/24/AR2010092404113.html
Weeks 1 Ethics (Online)
Name: ____________________________
Study Guide & Journal
Date: ______________
Journal Exercise

Free-write 10-15 minutes linking the question and/or quote with this weeks readings and
discussions. Focusing on analysis.

Handwritten answer and insert a picture of what you wrote into this Word document.
quote:
…human nature is so constituted as to desire nothing which not either a part of happiness or a means
of happiness, we can have no other proof, and we require no other… (Mill, 19).