What points from Stone’s interview can you see exemplified in her book?

1. Imagine you are a 6th grade teacher wanting to expand your classroom library’s nonfiction collection. You have the opportunity to address a group of potential financial donors and want to make clear to them the value of informational books. Name five values that informational books hold for children, and identify one book that will meet each value. For each book that you identify, provide full bibliographic information, a 2-3 sentence summary, and an explanation of why you believe that book provides the specific value. (20 points)
2. Select one specific social studies topic (from areas such as history, economics, social issues, cultures, customs, civics, etc.) that you might teach in an elementary grade. (A specific topic would be something like the American Revolution, managing money, civil rights, presidents, etc.) Identify the grade level and the topic, then make a list of five books that might be used in your students’ study of that topic. For each book that you identify, provide full bibliographic information, a 2-3 sentence summary, and at least one classroom activity you would engage students in to enrich their experience of the book. (20 points)
3. Locate and read the following article: Bang-Jensen, Valerie. (September 1, 2014). “Talking with Tanya Lee Stone.” Booklist, 111 (1S): 11-14. (You may locate this article online, or you may need to use databases provided by libraries available to you.) Next, read an informational book by Tanya Lee Stone. What points from Stone’s interview can you see exemplified in her book? (5 points)
4. Read the “Issue” box on page 521, then respond to the issue of who should write science information books for children by answering each of the three questions at the end of the text box. (6 points)
5. Your students have enjoyed the following fiction books, and want to read informational books about the same topics covered in these stories. Identify one informational book that you might recommend for each fiction title. Provide title and author for each informational book, and indicate the topic that it covers. (8 points)

a. The Book Thief by Marcus Zusak
b. The Tale of Despereaux by Kate DiCamillo
c. Out of the Dust by Karen Hesse
d. Scat by Carl Hiaasen
6. Read one of the following informational books by Steve Sheinkin: Bomb: The Race to Build and Steal the World’s Most Dangerous Weapon; Lincoln’s Grave Robbers; OR The Port Chicago 50: Disaster, Mutiny, and the Fight for Civil Rights. (15 points)

a. Provide complete bibliographic information and a 2-3 sentence summary of the book.
b. Evaluate the book according to the criteria for informational books discussed on pages 496-501. Address all criteria, and give specific references from the book to explain why it does or does not meet each of them.
7. Read one informational book that has won the American Library Association’s Robert F. Sibert Medal in the past 5 years. (This should be a different book than any you have read for other questions in this module.) (10 points)

a. Provide complete bibliographic information and a 2-3 sentence summary of the book.
b. Indicate the year in which the book won the Sibert Medal, then evaluate it according to criteria for the award. Identify what the award criteria are as you note how the book does or does not meet them. (Award criteria can be found at http://www.ala.org/alsc/awardsgrants/bookmedia/sibertmedal/sibertterms/sibertmedaltrms.)
c. Conclude with a statement indicating whether you believe the book was deserving of the Sibert Medal.
8. Read one informational book that has won NCTE’s Orbis Pictus Award in the past 5 years. (This should be a different book than any you have read for other questions in this module.) (10 points)
a. Provide complete bibliographic information and a 2-3 sentence summary of the book.
b. Indicate the year in which the book won the Orbis Pictus Award, then evaluate it according to criteria for the award. Identify what the award criteria are as you note how the book does or does not meet them. (Award criteria can be found at http://www.ncte.org/awards/orbispictus.)
c. Conclude with a statement indicating whether you believe the book was deserving of the Orbis Pictus Award.