What is the influence of gender diversity on the innovation capacity of leading IT companies in Vietnam

What is the influence of gender diversity on the innovation capacity of leading IT companies in Vietnam;; ; Instructions:
1. I have drafted the article’s abstract. You watch and adjust
2. The content of the article includes the following main sections:
Introduction (A Western-centric field; Vietnam: Economic transformation and entrepreneurial activities; Innovation cappacity; IT company…)
Background (Value of gender diversity Diversity; Value of collectivist attitudes; Value of a collaborative approach
Due; Value of innovation capacity; Related literature
Methods (Research design; Sample descriptions and data sources The; Identifying gender; Method; Control variables; Description of measures – content analysis )
Empirical results and discussion (Descriptive statistics;
Abstract: Women in are often considered the weaker sex, but in the field of information technology, there is a difference compared to other occupations. Information technology companies today increasingly attach importance to the role of women in the process of building products and creating outstanding innovation platforms and capabilities. With an aim to delve into how the working atmosphere is affected by gender diversity in software development teams, a questionnaire study was conducted with 78 participants consist of 21 women and 57 men at a large-scale software development company. This study examines the proportion of women in the workplace at one of the major IT companies in relation to innovation, the company’s innovation capacity. Organizations should create an environment that encourages and respects women in the workplace, which in turn will increase employee performance and benefit the organization.
Keyword: Innovation
Capability, Systematic review, Innovation performance, SME, Performance
management

Instructions:
Datasheet: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1fctXYKim7BsHHHHtY7pDZtMjguISvej2/edit?usp=sharing&ouid=108447709217259291350&rtpof=true&sd=true
This dataset includes the results of a survey study that is conducted at a large scale software development company. The survey was conducted with 78 software practitioners at the organization and 73% of the respondents were male. The average age was 27.8 years. The average experience was approximately 4 years. 58% of the respondents worked as programmers in their latest projects, followed by 12% who worked as testers. The questions consisted of 12 gender roles statements which were rated according to a 5-point gender scale (i.e. 1- mostly female, 2- slightly female, 3- both, 4- slightly male, and 5- mostly male). In addition, the survey included 10 statements about gender diversity and interactions, which were scored by participants on a 5-point scale ranging from 1 (Strongly disagree) through 2 (Disagree), 3 (Neutral), 4 (Agree) to 5 (Strongly agree). The last section of the survey was divided into two parts (i.e. for women and for men) which were answered by participants according to their gender identification. Lastly, participants were asked to give a range of values of the percentage of women in an ideal IT team.
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