Did anything about the researcher’s results and/or conclusions surprise you? Why or why not?

In 2-3 paragraphs, answer the questions below:

Did anything about the researcher’s results and/or conclusions surprise you? Why or why not?
Do you think the researchers used an appropriate method?
If yes, why do you think this way? What were some specific strengths of their method?
If not, what would you have suggested they do differently? Note that you may not simply address the limitations noted in the original article; I want to see you thinking critically about what they didn’t write.
Plan a follow-up study
If you were tasked with creating a follow-up study, what would you do and why?

➜ You may not simply address the limitations noted in the original article, repeat the same study with another sample, or follow up with the original participants later in life. The goal here is for you to demonstrate critical thought. For example, you might add another variable to the study, set up the study in a different way, or use a different operational definition of a variable. (An operational definition has to do with how you measure a variable. For example, there are many ways that you could measure “happiness,” each with its own pros and cons.)

In designing your study you may assume that you’ve got an incredibly large budget, and that any organizations you need to work with (companies, government agencies, etc.) have all agreed to do whatever you ask. In your answer (3-4 paragraphs total), you’ll need to briefly explain:

How does your study relate to the original study? Why would this be a beneficial follow-up?
Who will be in your sample, and why?
How will you collect your data?
What steps will you take to control for bias?
What steps will you take to ensure your study is ethical?
How will you analyze your data to determine if your hypothesis was supported? (Note: I’m not asking you to identify statistical tests here. But you do need to generally tell me what patterns you would look for in the data, something along the lines of “I’d want to see if scores in Group A are higher than those in Group B” or “I’d be looking for a positive correlation between Variable A and Variable B.”)